Exposures: Store Spotlight

The second iteration of Exposures, our project that features artists’ work in The Warhol Store and in the store windows, is on view through June 28, 2015. This time we took inspiration from the work of artist Corita Kent; an exhibition featuring her work is currently on view in the museum. Each artist was selected for his or her relationship to parts of Kent’s work, including self-discovery, collage, appropriation, and play. And color, lots of color.

New this time, you’ll have a chance to meet the artists, on Saturday, April 11. More information can be found here.

Image courtesy of Ron Copeland.

Image courtesy of Ron Copeland.

Ron Copeland is a self-taught mutli-disciplinary artist based in Pittsburgh. His light box sculptures are made from salvaged materials, recycled signs, and Plexiglas to create bright, colorful lamps. Copeland started using found materials for purely economic reasons, but he found that had a higher purpose, salvaging materials from being thrown into a landfill. Ron manipulates some pieces with added graphics and details of his own.

Image courtesy of Kim Fox.

Image courtesy of Kim Fox.

Worker Bird artist Kim Fox loves dirty hands, and it shows in her pieces using vintage tin and reclaimed wood. She moved to Pittsburgh from Florida in 2004 and finds inspiration from her new home, a “city that exists in the midst of both decay and rebirth,” set in the dramatic and changing landscape of Western Pennsylvania. Her pieces are part quilt-like collage, part iconic symbols of Pittsburgh, bridges, maps, and more.

Image courtesy of Cassie Griffin.

Image courtesy of Cassie Griffin.

Cassie Griffin is a Brooklyn-based ceramist who is continuously fascinated by the works’ essential elements: “glaze chemistry, clay bodies, sculptural vs functional, firing options—the list goes on.”  The Warhol’s Assistant Curator Jessica Beck discovered her work, and the works’ playfulness resonated with this project.

The store windows are a bright pop of color, but they’re so much more than that. Read about how Kent’s work influenced Cecilia Ebitz’s window installation here.

Each artist in his or her own way works with the objects and materials that you see every day without really seeing. Ceramic, wood, tin, Plexiglass, all reimagined and brought into a new realm.

Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent is on view through April 19, 2015.

Paul Matarrese

The Warhol: Store Manager